The Thing from the Sea (continued . . .)




As Sorra raised her hands to strike—Janno entered. Uncle ! We've returned— and all's well ! Nephew ! Sorra switched her aim to Janno ! You shall be the first to perish ! The three Trigans threw themselves aside as the searing green flame tore past. It struck the prisoner—Ura Zircon, Lord of the Planet Thalla ! Uuuuuh . . . Father ! Father and daughter ? I don't understand . . . She's a Thallan— and was infiltrated into the palace to kill you. Janno told his uncle about the Thallans' search for a new planet. What's this strange power she has ? It's some kind of electro-magnetic force they can aim from the fingertips—they all have it, which is why we tied Ura Zircon's hands behind him. And then—Ura Zircon opened his eyes. Oh, Father . . . It is fortunate that the force which would have killed a Trigan was only sufficient to stun me. There was no fight left in the Lord of Thalla. I have failed. My people are at your mercy—what are you going to do with us ? That is for the Imperial Council to decide.
That same day, the council of the Empire met to decide the fate of the Thallans. Trigo listened to their views. These monsters should be destroyed ! No—send them back where they came from ! Kill them, I say ! And then . . . I say NO ! There will be no more killing. The Trigan Empire has absorbed many peoples within its boundaries—why not the Thallans ? So it was that the Thallan survivors were brought before the Emperor. You will be given a vast area on the bed of the Great Ocean. Develop it —build your cities— raise your crops—and live in peace. Thank you, Imperial Majesty ! Later, Trigo spoke with Ura Zircon. Tell me—why did you choose Elekton for conquest ? It was the most suitable for our needs. We made many exploratory journeys to other planets . . . Ura continued . . . “including Earth. No doubt we alarmed them . . .” I wonder if the people of that planet could have defeated you —as we did !

This installment was originally published in Look and Learn issue no. 473 on 6 February 1971.

 

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