The Thing from the Sea (continued . . .)




As Sorra raised her hands to strike—Janno entered. Uncle ! We've returned— and all's well ! Nephew ! Sorra switched her aim to Janno ! You shall be the first to perish ! The three Trigans threw themselves aside as the searing green flame tore past. It struck the prisoner—Ura Zircon, Lord of the Planet Thalla ! Uuuuuh . . . Father ! Father and daughter ? I don't understand . . . She's a Thallan— and was infiltrated into the palace to kill you. Janno told his uncle about the Thallans' search for a new planet. What's this strange power she has ? It's some kind of electro-magnetic force they can aim from the fingertips—they all have it, which is why we tied Ura Zircon's hands behind him. And then—Ura Zircon opened his eyes. Oh, Father . . . It is fortunate that the force which would have killed a Trigan was only sufficient to stun me. There was no fight left in the Lord of Thalla. I have failed. My people are at your mercy—what are you going to do with us ? That is for the Imperial Council to decide.
That same day, the council of the Empire met to decide the fate of the Thallans. Trigo listened to their views. These monsters should be destroyed ! No—send them back where they came from ! Kill them, I say ! And then . . . I say NO ! There will be no more killing. The Trigan Empire has absorbed many peoples within its boundaries—why not the Thallans ? So it was that the Thallan survivors were brought before the Emperor. You will be given a vast area on the bed of the Great Ocean. Develop it —build your cities— raise your crops—and live in peace. Thank you, Imperial Majesty ! Later, Trigo spoke with Ura Zircon. Tell me—why did you choose Elekton for conquest ? It was the most suitable for our needs. We made many exploratory journeys to other planets . . . Ura continued . . . “including Earth. No doubt we alarmed them . . .” I wonder if the people of that planet could have defeated you —as we did !

This installment was originally published in Look and Learn issue no. 473 on 6 February 1971.

 

The Thing from the Sea (continued . . .)




Inside the alien mass that crouched like a submerged monster of the deep . . . . . . Janno, Keren and Roffa were imprisoned in airtight capsules of transparent fibre. All about them, the inhabitants of the vast, water-filled interior went about their tasks. Suddenly, the water level began to drop —and the strange people placed curiously- shaped devices into their throats. When the water had gone, the three captives were released from the capsules and led towards a commanding figure. So ! The Trigan prisoners ! And who are you ? I am Ura Zircon, Lord of the planet Thalla.
Our mother planet lies in the distant galaxy of Cerris, and is entirely covered by water. We are a water-breathing people. Regrettably, Thalla is moving inexorably nearer to one of its suns, which means that the surface of the planet will one day be a boiling mass . . . Mindful of my people's peril, I caused this conquest- machine to be constructed, so that we could leave Thalla and win another planet for our home. When all was ready, we launched ourselves in the machine and journeyed to Elekton—a planet whose way of life, speech and customs we had studied by long-range systems in our technology. Since then, the destroying units of the machine have been doing their work. Soon—with all civilisation in chaos —Elekton will be ours ! The three Trigans listened in awe and alarm to the rest of Ura Zircon's speech. Armed with the devices which enable them to breathe out of water, units of my people have infiltrated into the towns and cities of the surface. My own daughter is among them . . . She goes by the name of Sorra, and has gained herself a position of trust at the side of your emperor himself. Her task—when the time comes—will be to destroy Trigo ! Meanwhile, back at the Imperial Palace at Trigan City, the Emperor Trigo spoke approvingly to his new secretary You have done your work well, Sorra. I am pleased with you. You are too kind, Imperial Majesty.

This installment was originally published in Look and Learn issue no. 469 on 9 January 1971.